Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Now we know why teen girl said 'I deserve it' when pepper sprayed at Trump rally

    Back in late March I got a kick out of a video of a Trump protester starting a fight at a rally in Janesville, Wisc. It ends up with the girl getting pepper sprayed, and as she runs away she can be heard to say, "I deserved that." There were a number of reports on this.
     Although the video shows nothing of the kind, the 15-year-old girl starts screaming that an older man has groped her in the chest. The man backs away and denies touching her and tries to deescalate the situation, but the protester was having none of that. She finally ends up punching the elderly man in the face, at which point a Trump supporter immediately shoots her in the face with pepper spray.
    Her statement that "I deserved that" makes sense now that we know that the Clinton campaign engaged in an organized campaign to start fights at Trump rallies, using both volunteers and homeless or mentally ill people hired off the street. Sometimes they would provoke someone to hit them, but failing that they would simply fake an assault, as this girl apparently did. This girl knew she had crossed the line and was admitting it to herself, without realizing that she was being captured by cell phone video.
Injured officer, Chicago rally
    Hillary Clinton's dirty tricks campaign has not been without costs. Many people have been injured, and it's lucky no one was killed. A number of police officers have been hurt dealing with fights  at these rallies deliberately started by Clinton employees or volunteers. Innocent people have been arrested on false charges brought by Clinton's goon squads; some may have even been forced to plead guilty rather than risk a more serious conviction.
    These types of dirty tricks are far beyond anything Richard Nixon engaged in. In fact, all of Hillary Clinton's crookedness is far beyond that of Nixon; and yet she has the audacity to run for president.
    The criminal thug caught in the undercover video admitting that he helped to organize this Brownshirt brigade said Hillary Clinton was fully aware of the project and that he was working closely with her campaign. If so, this is just one more crime for which Hillary Clinton should be tried, convicted, and locked up.
    Anyone who has been injured at one of these rallies because of one of these fights needs to sue not only the Clinton campaign, but Hillary Clinton herself. Ultimately she is responsible for all of this.

Sunday, October 16, 2016

Why does Hillary Clinton dress like a mass murderer?

    Pol Pot killed about 1.5 million Cambodians, or 20 percent of the population. Mao's Great Leap Forward killed 45 million Chinese, with another 20 to 30 million dying during other grand communist programs. Kim Jong-un has racked up some spectacularly brutal executions, but his overall kill rate is fairly low, since he's only been in office a few years; but his father managed to kill about 1.5 million North Koreans.
    Does it worry anyone that a clearly power-hungry candidate for president of the United States constantly dresses like these people? It's not like this style of dress is fashionable; Hillary Clinton is the only person I ever see wearing these types of clothes
    The woman scares me no matter what, but her penchant for dressing like the world's worst mass murderers scares me even more.

Friday, October 14, 2016

Reporter fails to report 'truth' about Trump in 2005 or 2015, but now wants us to believe her

    Several women stepped forward this week to say that Donald Trump made unacceptable sexual advances towards them 10 to 40 years ago. This was part of an elaborate setup involving Clinton campaign staffer Anderson Cooper and women who were willing to make up any story to harm the Trump campaign.
    Right before the second presidential debate, a recording was released of Trump talking into a hot mic with Access Hollywood host Billy Bush. Bush was encouraging him with a lot of sex talk, and Trump was going right along. It was certainly not presidential, but it was private, locker-room talk that Trump was goaded into making. As far as the Reprehensibility Meter goes, it certainly didn’t rise to the level of the many rapes and assaults that I believe Bill Clinton has committed, with Hillary Clinton serving as an accessory after the fact.
    When Clinton campaign representative Anderson Cooper kicked off the second debate with a question about sexual assault and kissing, I immediately suspected that it was already arranged for someone to step forward and make some type of claim against Trump. I was correct. What surprised me was how weak all of the claims were. Let’s examine just one of them, with more to come.
    Natasha Stoynoff is a reporter for People magazine who wrote a story about story about Donald and Melania Trump’s first wedding anniversary in 2005. Describing the alleged assault at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate, she said, “We walked into that room alone, and Trump shut the door behind us. I turned around, and within seconds he was pushing me against the wall and forcing his tongue down my throat.” (It would be helpful if Stoynoff had specified exactly which room this supposedly occurred in, as several of the rooms have glass walls; of course, that may be why she was intentionally vague).
    Are we really to believe that a reporter for a national publication wouldn’t find this worthy of some type of mention in 2005? I simply can’t. I once was involved in sending a reporter to do a nice little story on Jerry Lee Lewis’ birthday party. During an interview, an inebriated Lewis chose to playfully point a pistol as our reporter a couple of times, which he found not amusing at all, and that became the most important part of the story. So instead of a nice, happy story on Jerry Lee’s birthday there was a story about how Jerry Lee is still running around drunk and unhinged these days. That’s what reporters do, and that’s what Natasha Stoynoff would have done if Trump had actually forced a kiss of this type on her. Even if she comes up with some lame excuse for not reporting the incident, it certainly was newsworthy a year ago, at the start of the presidential campaign. Why the silence until Anderson Cooper laid the trap?
    The fact that People magazine would go along with this shows that the media, for the most part, are no longer journalistic enterprises, but rather public relations outfits for the American left and the global elite. Like any good P.R. firm, they will share bad news about their product when forced to do so, but their job is one of promotion, not reporting.
    In the end there is no way for us to know whether some of these claims are true or not. In some cases there are factual inaccuracies that prove them impossible. But in other cases, such as the claim of Stoynoff, we have to just decide whether or not they are true based on their plausibility. For her claim to be true, she would have to be a really terrible reporter who chose to remain silent when her claim might have hurt Trump during the Republican primaries, but who suddenly felt the need to come forward when it was just a two-person race. Under these circumstances, I do not believe her.
    The American media simply cannot be trusted, as batch after batch of hacked DNC emails show collusion with various members of the Fourth Estate and the Clinton campaign. After the second presidential debate, NBC did a "Fact Check" on Donald Trump's claim that Hillary Clinton had "acid washed" her email server. With a graphic that said "NOPE," NBC corrected the record: "Clinton's team used an app called BleachBit; she did not use a corrosive chemical." This is not a joke. It's like saying, NOPE, she didn't murder the man with a double-barrelled shotgun; it was a single-barrelled shotgun. (For the record, sometimes "acid wash" is used as a generic term for permanently wiping a server, although dipping a server in acid will certainly do the trick, and is sometimes done).
    Perhaps someday we will again be able to turn on the television or pick up a newspaper and get truthful news coverage, but for now the Media, like the Clintons, exist only to serve the interests of the global elitists.

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

The sabatoge of Trump's campaign may result in two new political parties, defeat of GOP traitors

    There are accusations, which I believe, that House Speaker Paul Ryan and other top Republicans have been planning to sabatoge the presidential campaign of Donald Trump for weeks. The release of Trump's foul-mouthed tapes from years ago just hours before he was to appear at a rally with Ryan, and the coordinated response, is too convenient.
    The finger is being pointed at Dan Senor, an advisor to both Ryan and 2012 Republican nominee Mitt Romney. Whether or not Senor was behind the release of the tapes, he has been active on Twitter urging journalists to use them against Trump.
    In a conference call Ryan told Republican House members that he would no longer defend Trump, although he did not "withdraw" his endorsement. He did this the day after Trump absolutely slaughtered Hillary Clinton in a debate, in an effort to make sure that his campaign wouldn't recover.
    This isn't a campaign of Republicans against Democrats. This is a campaign of Globalists against Americans, and the Globalists are doing everything they can to subjugate the American people. The GOP leadership really doesn't care which party controls government, so long as it is controlled by Globalists.
    I don't particularly like Donald Trump; he is certainly an incredibly imperfect torch-bearer for the American cause. But he's what we have, and I support him. If enough Americans stand up and fight, he can still win.
    I think several of the Republicans who were so quick to pull their endorsements from Trump are going to go down this November. I suspect McCain is toast, and I've love to see Ryan thrown out. I think New Hampshire Sen. Kelly Ayotte is a certain loser after pulling her endorsement. Good riddance!
    There is a real possibility that after this election we could see the formation of two new political parties. The left wing of the Democrat party, consisting of socialists and welfare recipients, may break off and form an American Socialist party, leaving behind only a small number of global elitists who have been in control. Trump supporters are likely to leave the Republican Party to support an anti-war, American Nationalist party, again leaving behind a group of global elitists. Perhaps what is left of the Republican and Democrat party can then merge.
    A lot of people refer to the Trump movement as a "white" Nationalist movement. This is an intentional slander. The Los Angeles Times poll shows Trump getting 15 percent of the black vote and 35 percent of the Hispanic vote, far and away more than either Romney or McCain received.
    Nationalism is merely Citizenism, the belief that a nation exists to serve its citizens, not the interests of non-citizens or illegal aliens. There is no reason why law-abiding blacks or Hispanics would want to see their rights as citizens diluted by criminals any more than whites would. Nationalism serves all citizens.
    Our duty now, as Americans, is to identify anyone who has intentionally sabotaged the campaign of Donald Trump and work towards their defeat. There really is no difference between a Globalist Republican and a Globalist Democrat, but I'd at least get some satisfaction from the defeat of Globalist Republicans.
    Goodbye McCain, Ryan, Ayotte, and assorted other Judas-types.

Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Forget the achievement gap -- blacks in Oxford's Class of 2016 have great ACT scores

    There’s been quite a ruckus over a news story stating that the Oxford School District was considering the creation of a separate opt-in school, or school-within-a-school, for students on the federal school-lunch program in an effort to reduce the school's achievement gap.
    The Oxford School Board held a special meeting Friday, Sept. 30, to address community concerns, and released a press release apologizing, and stating that no separate school would be formed.
    The separate academy idea might be a good one for a district with 20,000 students. For a district with 4,000 it just doesn't work for a variety of reasons. I won’t address some of the comments made by Superintendent Bryan Harvey, save to say that they weren’t very well thought out. However ham-handed some of Harvey’s comments might have been, he and the school board do deserve credit for trying to provide the best education possible for every Oxford student. Their heart was in the right place even if their head wasn't.
    There is a huge socio-economic divide in the Oxford student body; although located in the poorest state in the nation, the median price for houses listed for sale in Oxford is almost $250,000. I suspect the disparities of wealth, which often fall along racial lines, cause some real problems when it comes to school management.
    Although the proposed academy was presented as a way to help low-income students, in reality it was almost certainly designed to reduce Oxford’s racial achievement gap, which is  the largest in the state. Last month the high school gave the school board the results of the junior ACT tests, which all students now take; the school ACT average was 22.2; white students had an average ACT score of 24.6 while black students had an average score of 18.1, which was a substantial increase from the year before. On its face this is a huge achievement gap, but when you analyze the reasons for the difference, these numbers are easily explained, and should be a source of great pride for Oxford.
    Oxford has has a tremendous number of near-geniuses; the school’s top quintile is probably equal to any school in the nation, including highly selective schools such as Stuyvesant, the Phillips schools, etc. Oxford is a medical, legal, and academic center, and as such attracts a large number of professionals, researchers, and college professors, along with their children. Most of these affluent, advanced-degree-holders are white or Asian. No matter where you are in the country, children of wealthy professionals or college professors tend to do very well academically. There is nothing that any school can do that will allow other students to "catch-up" to these students.
    Add to this the fact that because of its good schools Oxford has a reputation as a brain-cluster community. Most parents are able to perceive whether their children are far smarter than average at a fairly young age, and quite a number of these parents – overwhelmingly affluent and white – are moving to Oxford specifically to take advantage of Oxford’s quality schools. Again, these students are well ahead of the game when they move into the system. There is nothing the district can do that will cause other students to "catch-up" with them.
    All of these factors distort Oxford’s achievement gap. If you take out the disproportionate number of children of advanced-degree holders, much of the achievement gap simply disappears. Once you do this you can focus on something else, namely that based on 2016 ACT scores Oxford apparently does an outstanding job of educating its minority students.
    According to charts provided by the ACT, a score of 18 is in the 71st percentile in comparison to black students nationally. In Mississippi, the average black student ACT score is 16.6 while the average white score is 20.8. In other words, Oxford, with last year's average black ACT score of 18.1, is doing an outstanding job of educating its minority students in comparison to other Mississippi school districts, at least insofar as the Class of 2016 is concerned.
    I've tried to find the ACT average for black students at other Mississippi schools, but Oxford is one of the few school districts to have this information available online. It is possible, however, to compare the performance of Oxford's black students to the whole-school average of schools that are made up of 90 percent or more black students. Here are some of those figures: Aberdeen,  16.7; Ashland, 16.3; Clarksdale, 15.1; Greenwood, 15.8; Hazlehurst, 15.5; Holly Springs, 16.2; Jackson, 15.6; and so on. In fact, a majority of Mississippi school districts have an averageACT score of less than 18.1, regardless of their demographic makeup.
    I pointed out some years ago that a good school should cause the student achievement gap to increase every year. That's because such gaps are caused by some students being able to learn more quickly than others, whether due to natural talent or support at home. The only way to reduce such gaps is for a school to simply refuse educational services to its brightest students, which is child abuse. In the fable of The Tortoise and the Hare, the tortoise won the race because the hare took a nap. The only way to narrow achievement gaps is to make the fastest learners take intellectual "naps" by refusing them educational services.
    Oxford High School has an incredibly large clump of very high scorers on the ACT every year, and this elite group, made up almost entirely of white and  Asian students, causes a huge achievement gap in test scores. But the success of these mostly wealthy, near-genius students doesn't make Oxford's black students any less successful. Yes, there is room for improvement, but in comparison to other districts Oxford's black students are doing well, and the community needs to know that.
    The sad fact is that the Oxford School Board was taken in by a bunch of charlatans who convinced them there was a problem when none existed. An achievement gap isn't a problem. If black ACT scores drop back down to the state average, that's a problem.

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Confederate flag resolution, Gaines election proof Saddlebackers in control of Southern Baptists

    The Southern Baptist Convention, led by its Pope of Political Correctness Russell D. Moore, passed a resolution in June denouncing the display of the Confederate battle flag, being the same flag patterned on the cross on which Andrew, Disciple of Jesus Christ, was crucified. This was just one resolution among many that suggest the church leadership is completely out of step with the church membership.

   Anyone doing a Google search will find as many or more photos of Klansmen carrying American flags than Confederate ones. To single out the Confederate flag for this type of denunciation is pure anti-Confederate bigotry and politically correct posturing. It is un-Christian. We need to either keep both flags or ban them both.
    The Southern Baptist church has apologized for its role in slavery, which is laudable. As someone who considers the Confederate flag a part of my Southern heritage, I want to add my voice yet again to those who say slavery was wrong. We shouldn’t abolish the Baptist Church because it once supported slavery, or because of the misguided actions of a few idiots. But we shouldn’t stop displaying the Confederate flag on these grounds, either. The same rules which apply to the flag should apply to the Baptist church; either keep both or abolish both.  
    The fact is that today you will be hard-pressed to find a Baptist who supports slavery. You will have an equally hard time finding someone who displays the Confederate flag who supports slavery. To single out the Confederate flag in this manner is immoral.
    I don’t believe race-hustler Russell Moore -- a really nasty guy -- or the delegates to the Southern Baptist conclave represent the views of the majority of Southern Baptists, whether the issue is the Confederate flag, economic migrants and potential terrorists from Syria, amnesty for criminal illegal immigrants, Donald Trump, or what have you. I say this as a former Baptist who knows lots of very sensible and very outraged Southern Baptists. And I find Moore’s attempts to change the church to make it morre appealing to the Starbucks set and Third-Worlders, such as his recent insistence that Christ was “dark-skinned,” to be offensive and without Biblical or factual support.
    So how did these left-wingers come to be in charge of the Southern Baptist Church? Most are adherents to the Saddleback Purpose Driven Church Cult, and have secretly and systematically wormed their way into positions of authority. In other words, these people have intentionally stolen the Southern Baptist Church. Interestingly enough, no person is a better example of that cult’s techniques of mind and church control than the new Southern Baptist president, Steve Gaines, pastor of Bellevue Baptist Church in Memphis, but more on him later.
    The entire Purpose Driven Church Cult movement is based on the notion that church leaders should seize power, eliminate congregational control, and bend churches to their will, presumably to what they see as God’s will as well. In many cases God's first wish is that these pastors receive an incredibly large salary. This is what has happened to the Baptists, and why you see them passing resolutions that many rank-and-file members find to be outrageous.
    The methodology of the Saddlebackers is no secret, although they sometimes go back and erase their tracks. They have published their roadmap for pastors and people like Russell Moore to follow in an effort to subvert the Gospel and seize control of churches.
    How can you know if your church is being controlled by Saddlebackers or their ilk? Some of the main signs are the forced use of "praise choruses" over proper hymns, a "New Member's" Sunday School class, elimination of regular business meetings, tithing obsession, and use of words like "worship center," "campus," and "unchurched." The New Member classes are designed to isolate new members from the general church population so they can be indoctrinated by the seeker-sensitive leadership. (This blog post quotes quite a bit from various Saddleback and Willow Creek sources and is worth reading).
    To understand the techniques used by the Saddlebackers, I urge the reading of this post, which reprints a gloating (and infuriating) article written by a church "transitioner" who stole a church. Or this brochure. I also suggest this article, which describes the way Steve Gaines took control of the remnants of Bellevue Baptist Church, where attendance is down dramatically since his arrival.
    Now, a little about Steve Gaines. After arriving at Bellevue, Rev. Gaines was visited by a man in his late twenties, the son of Bellevue associate pastor. This man told Gaines that as a young teen his father had engaged in sexual intercourse with him on a regular basis over 12 to 18 months until the teen insisted that it stop. The man told Gaines that he did not allow his father to be around his own children unsupervised, and he did not believe his father should be counseling victims of sexual abuse, which was this pastor's role at Bellevue. Gaines spoke with the pastor and has said the man admitted to some type of improper conduct with his son, although Gaines did not specify exactly what that admission was.
   So what did Gaines do? Well, I'll give you three guesses:

Guess Number One: He fired the associate pastor.
Guess Number Two: He notified the police.
Guess Number Three: Not a blessed thing.

    The answer, of course, is absolutely nothing, although Gaines said he did launch an internal investigation, during which which the man continued to carry out his church duties of counseling victims of domestic and sexual abuse.
    When this outrage was finally discovered six months later, Gaines' excuse was that he had understood that his predecessor, Adrian Rodgers, had known of the problem and approved of the pastor staying on. I absolutely don't believe this, but let's play this out. Gaines' position is that if it's okay with Adrian Rodgers for pastors to have sex with their teenage sons then it's okay with him. It's as if Gaines held there is no higher moral authority than Adrian Rodgers, which is ridiculous.
     At Bellevue, Gaines has operated according to the Saddleback formula with zeal. He has declared from the pulpit that those who didn't fully support him should just leave any position of leadership, such as Sunday School teacher. His tithing obsession is such that he's suggested that God might strike members dead if they fail to tithe. He's refused to follow church bylaws or to provide copies of them to members, and made it clear that he doesn't believe in business meetings. And of course he's driven off those who don't agree with him, some of whom have created blogs to vent their discontent, such as the erased-but-remembered Saving Bellevue blog, and the inactive New BBC Open Forum. These are interesting reading, to say the least. These blogs are inactive today because these former members have moved on; Gaines was successful in seizing control and running off the opposition.
    I should note that there is nothing inherently wrong with some of the things the Saddlebackers are doing, and if people can be reached with rock bands and coffee-house services, great. The sin is that these changes are being made secretly. If church members vote during a Wednesday night business meeting that the music director should replace traditional hymns with insipid praise choruses, then the music director should do exactly that. But for a pastor or music director to engage in this type of secret transitioning without the express request of the congregation is a sin. It's church theft.
    For people like Russell Moore, Steve Gaines, and the Saddlebackers, it's all about money and market share. If traditional hymns aren't popular among certain demographic groups they believe are needed for growth, throw them out and replace them with mindless chanting (ignoring, of course, the needs of the current members). If the word "church" isn't trendy, call it a "campus." The Confederate flag has fallen out of favor, so they they got their properly indoctrinated chanters to pass a resolution denouncing it in hopes of gaining favor with the liberal media.
    The Southern Baptist Convention is now led by a man who knowingly kept a child-molesting pastor on his staff as a counselor to victims of abuse for six months, and only let him go after a public outcry. The morally bankrupt people who elected this man had the audacity to tell the world that it's wrong to honor the memory of our ancestors and that we have a duty to throw open our borders to economic migrants, some of whom are bound to be terrorists.
    I'll not take advice on morality from this depraved bunch.

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Interactive graphic shows transformation of Ole Miss, Alabama into regional, national universities

Click to enlarge
   The Chronicle of Higher Education  has an interesting interactive graphic that allows one to see the geographic origin of the freshman class of almost any university in the United State from 1998 to 2014.
    As a parent with two kids doing college searches, it’s good to be able to see the makeup of the student body of various colleges. I also found it interesting to view the changes at two of the fastest-growing flagships in the country, Ole Miss and Alabama.
    Both Ole Miss and Alabama have exploded in size over the past 20 years, fueled in large part by out-of-state enrollment. These out-of-state students pay a large supplement, almost paying private-school rates to attend a public college. In other words, these students are a real profit center for the schools and subsidize the in-state students
    In 1998 Ole Miss was already attracting a fair number of out-of-state students, with 985 in-state and 824 non-resident freshmen, for an out-of-state percentage of 46 percent of a freshman class of 1,809. Almost a third of these were from Tennessee, and from my experience most were from Memphis or the Southwest part of the state; in some ways these Tennessee students weren't really from out of state, since Ole Miss was their closest flagship.
    By 2014 the freshman class size had more than doubled, to 3,809, with 1,688 in-state and 2,121 non-residents, or 56 percent out-of-state.
    One of the biggest changes in the composition of the Ole Miss freshman class is the increase in the number of students from Texas and Georgia. In Texas, the 10-Percent Rule (or Seven-Percent Rule, depending on the mood of the moment) has made admission to that state’s top schools almost impossible for good students from top school districts. In Georgia, the Hope Scholarship has encouraged the state’s best students to attend the University of Georgia or Georgia Tech, and made admission highly competitive (the average freshman ACT at Georgia is 29).
    The Texas and Georgia numbers are plain to see. In 1998, Texas sent 84 and Georgia 78 freshmen to Ole Miss. In 2014 those numbers were 353 and 295. In 1998 California sent four students; in 2014, 84. Connecticut went from three to 19. Massachusetts, one to 15. New Jersey, zero to 21. Pennsylvania, 3 to 23. Florida 23 to 99. And so on.
    Over at Alabama, the growth has been even more explosive and transformative. In 1998 Alabama had 2,616 freshmen with only 26 percent coming from out of state. So in 1998 Ole Miss was much more of a regional school than Alabama. By 2014 Alabama had 6,824 freshmen, 2,462 in-state and 4,362, or 64 percent, out of state. The growth in the number of Northeastern and far West students attending Alabama far exceeds the growth at Ole Miss. Connecticut went from five to 67 from 1998 to 2014. Massachusetts, two to 85. New Jersey, nine to 142. Pennsylvania, five to 123. Florida 71 to 386.
    Both Ole Miss and Alabama are using generous merit scholarships to attract top students from around the country. Students with a 32 on the ACT can attend tuition-free; at Alabama, if a student finishes in fewer than eight semesters he can use the scholarship towards graduate school.
    Alabama gets a lot more buzz over its Presidential Scholarship than Ole Miss does for its Academic Excellence Award, and the graduate school rollover certainly makes it a better deal. On the other hand, top students have a far greater chance of being able to stack scholarships and perhaps even get a full ride at Ole Miss.
    Of course, most out-of-state students don’t get scholarships; they pay their own way. Part of what attracts them to Ole Miss or Alabama is the desire to attend a relatively small, traditional Southern school.
    There can be too much of a good thing, though. If these schools keep going on their current trajectory, neither will be small nor Southern 20 years from now. And that’s not a good thing, in my view.